By March 4, 2012 Read More →

Herbs In The Bug-Out Bag: Yarrow

By Shall
Herbalism and Survival Blog

Another favorite multi-purpose herb for the bugout bag is Yarrow.

As a first aid remedy, the leaves and/or flowering tops of Yarrow can stop bleeding. It has also been called Wound Wort and has been used on battlefields to heal the wounds of soldiers.

Yarrow has anti-microbial, astringent, and inflammation reducing properties. A tea made from the leaves and flowering tops can be used as a wash for cleaning wounds. A piece of cloth can be soaked in the tea or the tea bag itself can be placed over a wound. The dried herb can be powdered and sprinkled on wounds to stop the bleeding and even dull the pain.

The healing abilities of Yarrow are not limited to wounds. Yarrow is an herb I reach for at the first sign of a cold or flu. When taken internally, it can open the pores for cleansing and works to release fevers. The leaves and flowers have also been used in insect repellant recipes.

The leaves and flowering tops can be soaked in olive oil and made into herbal oil to rub on sore areas and a little beeswax can be added to the oil to make a salve.




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6 Comments on "Herbs In The Bug-Out Bag: Yarrow"

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  1. TED says:

    GO TO ANY INTERMOUNTAIN FARMERS AND THEY CARRY STOP BLEED.POWDER ITS A POWDER THAT STOPS LARGE ANIMALS FROM BLEEDING,JUST POUR ON THE WOUND AND IT WILL STOP WITHIN SECONDS. AND ITS VERY CHEAP, I HAVE USED IT ON MYSELF.

    .

  2. Michelle says:

    I personally keep a bottle of liquid bandaid in my bug-out bag. It takes up little space, it’s light and I’ve used it several times. 2x on bleeding head wounds. If budget is an issue then you can use super-glue but it’s harder to apply than the liquid bandaid.

  3. JW M says:

    Michelle & Ted, good plans, but what about next week or next year?

  4. Teagan says:

    I live in Wisconsin and I was wondering what plant could I find and use to help me in a doomsday scenario?

  5. Sheila says:

    I have several reasons for choosing to turn to herbal medicine. I believe natural remedies have been provided for a reason. I am also thankful for the availability regardless of the season because they can be dried or prepared in a tincture or liniment for longer term storage. And, being a practical person, herbs which help a variety of illnesses or complaints are very useful, especially when storage space is an issue. And, last but not least, they are way more affordable.

    Teagan, I only written about two good herbs to have on hand so far and I plan to write about more herbs and herbal remedies for the APN State Blogs.

  6. Mitchella says:

    Excellent recommendation for a medicinal herb. Just want to point out that the photo shown is yellow flowers. There are many decorative hybrids that are not the true Achillea millefolium. The medicinal plant needs to be the white flowers, preferably from the wild, but a garden plant works very well. When out in the field, be sure you know the difference between Yarrow and Poison Hemlock. Not appropriate for long term use with pregnancy.

    Teagan – Plantain is an excellent plant to get to know. It’s nature’s band-aid. You’ll know it, most people think it’s an eyesore in their lawn. Be sure to pick where there are no chemicals used. Look up an image for Plantago major or Plantago lanceolata. There’s a slim leaf and a broad leaf. It is distinctive with long veins running the length of the leaf. Chew it up and put it on any skin irritation. It can start to work in minutes. Fresh leaf is best. Anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory.