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BPA Concerns and the Storing of Water

I used to store water in the commercial plastic bottles that it came in, however, I am truly concerned about the BPA situation in plastics.  Bisphenol A is an organic compound that is used to make plastics.  BPA is controversial because it exerts a hormone-like property and is raising concerns for fetuses, infants and young children.  There is a long list of disorders and diseases that it might be connected with, and Canada has banned it’s use in baby bottles.

So what is a prepper to do about the minimum 1 gallon per person (3 is more sensible), per day, emergency needs?  Doing something is better than doing nothing.  We are doing the best we can, as quickly as we can with the resources we have.  It may very well be that plastic is the only sensible way to store water for some and after air to breathe, water comes second in the needs of a human being.  Yes, food for a year is good, but having no water after three days and that food becomes unimportant.  BPA may kill us slowly but having no water to drink is fast.  So, store bottled water rather than no water at all.  Eat healthy and live healthy meanwhile.

We store rain water in barrels and in the pool.  We have a well.  We are planning on purchasing a quantity of lifestraws for emergency purifying.  I keep water in canning jars and empty them as I use them for canning.  The jars have to be stored, they might as well store water.  I use a Reynolds food vac and the attachments for wide and regular jar vacuums.  This is not a good seal for preserving food but it is adequate for water.  If you leave space at the top, you can put the jars in the freezer to help keep the food frozen, in case of a power outage, or to use as a cold pack at picnics etc. The water is, of course, drinkable.  The water is rotated by bringing those jars in and out of use when canning.

The University of Nebraska suggests that processing jars for 20 minutes in a water bath would preserve water, killing all possible bacteria for long term storage.  My feeling is that this is water for a “possible emergency” and if needed for that emergency, I would be able to boil it then or otherwise decontaminate it.  Using precious resources to heat water that might only be used for watering plants is more a waste of those resources.

DO YOU HAVE CONCERNS ABOUT BPA?

WHAT PLANS HAVE YOU MADE IN STORING WATER FOR YOUR HOUSEHOLD?



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6 Comments on "BPA Concerns and the Storing of Water"

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  1. Suzy says:

    Yes I have had those concerns as well, do you know if BPA is in 55 gallon food-graded barrels? I was under the impression those were safe for storage. Of course they take up a huge amount of space but a good alternative if they do not contain BPA. Curious to know your input, thanks!

  2. flmom says:

    Several brands of water are in BPA-free bottles such as Penta and Evamor. Of course those brands are quite expensive. Nestle Pure Life is one of the top three rated waters (along with Penta and Gerber) and is in BPA-free bottles as long as it is size 3 gallons or less.

  3. Fred Lake says:

    Reading the article BPA Concerns and the Storing of Water i noticed using glass canning jars for storage of water. If you take a look at the canning lids the inside is white this is a BPA lining. You can buy the old fashion non BPA lids but a much higher cost. You have to look for BPA free on the products.

    • Very True Mr. Lake, it may be a concern if you were canning with them since heat releases the chemical process. I personally use resealable lids that mypatriotsupply.com sells. They are expensive but pay for themselves over time and no BPA. And I do not process the water jars. I pull out the oxygen with the Reynolds vac. Excellent point however.

  4. Andrew Bullock says:

    I have been looking at purchasing bulk granular activated charcoal for water purification along with sand and linen. I am curious as to the type of GAC that would be best recommended for this purpose, as suppliers have been less than helpful in answering, and seem to want to sell high grade expensive product versus what is actually needed. Any input or advice would be greatly appreciated.



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