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By August 9, 2012 Read More →

A Year of Supplemental Food Storage for $300 for my family of FOUR !!

I have come across an amazing find, thanks to a FB friend; I have learned how to add enough food to my storage to feed us (2 adults and two kids) for a year!  This is a combination of legumes, grains, beans etc that provides balanced, nutritious meals daily very cheap.  The thing I love about this recipe is that it can be changed in many different ways by adding left over meats, vegetables, dry vegetables, TVP, potatoes, etc.

This recipe has been around the internet for years now, but this is the first time I have seen it.  I have researched for hours on ways to get a year of supplemental food storage for $300 for my family of FOUR for a reasonable cost and finally found it, so I thought I would share it with all of our APN readers. :)

Note: Please feel free to share this with everyone you know. I feel it will greatly benefit anyone that has food storage, struggles with food storage, or is just beginning.  I know for me, the thought of trying to get enough food for a year was sooo overwhelming, but with this plan, it created a *baseline* for me to build on so I felt secure knowing I had at least some basics to make a meal for my family.  This will last a year if you ration it properly, but you will want/need to add things like meat and other vegetables (canned or dehydrated) to your pot of food.  Lets face the facts, no one wants to eat the same thing over and over day in and day out.  So you will want to build on this once you have it.

I am going to list the things needed and what you are supposed to do so you have an easy list at hand and instructions to add to your buckets.

What you will need:

Food:

  • 4 x 22 pounds of rice. Any kind of rice will do.  (Four 20 pound bags + 8 one pound bags) OR two 50lb bags at Sam’s.
  • 2 x 11 pounds of Kidney Beans.  (22 one pound bags)
  • 2 x 11 pounds of barley.  (22 one pound bags)
  • 2 x 11 pounds of yellow lentils.  (22 one pound bags)
  • 1 x 5.5 pounds of split green peas.  (6 one pound bags)
  • 1 x 5.5 chick peas/garbanzo beans.  (6 one pound bags)
  • 30 pounds beef or chicken bouillon.  (or both) It will be added to each batch as you cook it.

Hardware:

  • Four/Five 5 gallon buckets for the rice. (rice usually settles if you shake it down so its give or take here)
  • One 5 gallon bucket for kidney beans.
  • One five gallon bucket for the barley.
  • One 5 gallon bucket for the yellow lentils.
  • One 1 gallon bucket for the split green peas.
  • One 1 gallon bucket for the chick peas/garbanzo.
  • Thirty-two oxygen absorbers

Total of  six 10 gallon buckets and two 1 gallon buckets.

Approximate Cost Where I Live: (Revised note 2013: The links attached to the items are not the cost I paid buying them on sale. I am adding the links upon request of the readers to bulk options of the food items listed.)

  • Rice @ Sam’s: 2 x $16.48 = $32.96 (two 50 lb bags)
  • Kidney Beans /sale: 22 x $0.67 = $14.74
  • Pearl Barley /sale: 22 x $0.59 = $12.98
  • Lentils / sale: 22 x $0.45 = $9.90
  • Green Split Peas / sale: 6 x $0.40 = $2.40
  • Chick peas (garbanzo) / sale: 6 x $0.58 = $3.48
  • Beef Bouillon: $65.49 (Revised Note 2013: I have been asked about a link to bouillon in bulk. Here is one option. It is 2 dollars higher per pound due to inflation in 2013.)

Total Food:   $141.95

Total Hardware: $153.92

Total combined cost: $295.87

Note: The reason the title says for $300 is to give some room based on cost of living in your area.

Directions:

  • Put split green peas and the chick peas in a separate 1 gallon bucket, add 1 OA (Ooxygen Absorber) to the bucket, seal.
  • Put Barley, Kidney beans, and lentils in separate 5 gallon containers adding 5 OA per bucket, seal.
  • Divide rice up in remaining 5 gallon buckets with 5 OA in each bucket, seal.

How to make your soup:

  • 8 oz of rice
  • 2 oz of red kidney beans
  • 2 oz of pearl barley
  • 2 oz of lintels
  • 1 oz of split green peas
  • 1 oz of chick peas/garbanzo’s
  • Bouillon to taste

Take the 16 oz dry mixture and add 6-7 quarts of water with a spoon of butter or olive oil (optional) to prevent the water from boiling over.  Add 3 tablespoons bouillon or to taste.  Then add any other meats, vegetables, potatoes or seasonings you’d like to.  I personally love to add garlic and Lima beans.  DO NOT add onions.  They will spoil the mixture. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for two hours.  You should have enough to feed 4 people for two days if rationed correctly.

Note: Onions ferment too quickly and will cut the time you are able to store the already cooked soup mixture. There is always the option of dried onions and you can add it to smaller batches you know will be eaten on the first day.

On the second day you will need to add more water and a tablespoon of bouillon because it will thicken in the refrigerator overnight. Boil for a min of ten minutes to kill off any potential bacteria, especially if you’re not able to store it in the refrigerator because you’re without electricity.

You will be full off of ONE large bowl of this delicious soup.  The kids usually eat about a half a bowl with bread.  That’s what makes it so great.  If able to, bake some bread or corn bread to go with it.

If there is any mixture left on the third day, then just add it to the new mixture you make.  (If making a new mixture on the third day) As time goes by you will learn to tell how much of each ingredient you need to fit your family’s needs.

With the exception of dairy and Vitamin B 12, this should take care of your nutritional needs.  Maybe not all of your wants, but once you get this out of the way, you can concentrate on adding the stuff you want to your food storage knowing you have enough for a year already if you half to use it.

I hope this helps you all to begin or expand your food storage like it has me!

Keepin It Spicy,

Jalapeño Gal

Note: These prices may or may not go up a little with inflation after 2013.

Please visit my store: Jalapeño Gal’s Survival Surplus

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About the Author:

Cari is an editor and author for American Preppers Network. Her family currently live in Georgia. Cari spends her free time gardening, canning, testing products for review, helping others prepare and going to the gym. She believes preparedness is about love and taking care of your family. Cari also has her own website where she shares all of her preparedness articles and her recipes for canning, dehydrating, juicing, basic cooking. To have a look and hopefully follow her: Click Here! Please Join My New Blog!

137 Comments on "A Year of Supplemental Food Storage for $300 for my family of FOUR !!"

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  1. Thanks for this post, Cari.  Very helpful!

    • Steve says:

      Anyone eating or planning to eat lots of rice should be aware that recent studies are showing that rice is loaded – heavily loaded – with arsenic. There is some detailed information here at Consumer Reports (http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/11/arsenic-in-your-food/index.htm) and a Google search for “rice arsenic” will bring up lots of hits.

      “…rice eaten just once a day can drive arsenic levels in the human body up 44 percent. Rice eaten twice a day can lead to a 70 percent increase in arsenic…”

      • Meeknotweak says:

        Thanks for the article and a quick note to add:- Not all rice is grown in high arsenic tainted soils. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsenic_poisoning give you the US situation. We ahve sourced NON GMO Rice from a family farm in the boothill of MO for those two very reasons. Thanks for the headsup and whilst it has merit, NOT all rice is tainted. Know your growers, is what we say.

        • Terri says:

          Is this in relation to rice grown in countries outside the US?

          • Steve says:

            Terri, It is rice grown *inside* the US. Read the report, MOST rice you buy in stores HAS ARSENIC. The “Basmati” rices from the study have the least amount, therefore would be the best selection. The article/report mentions brands and types of rice, and areas with amounts of arsenic. Explore the links in the article – some are PDF’s and they are all informative. It is NOT related to GMO in any way. When grown, rice is soaking in water. When the water is contaminated by ARSENIC in the SOIL from prior years of pesticide treatment the rice absorbs it. Read the article which is very informative, and to be sure do some searches on your own – then decide for yourself which rice to pick.

  2. no problem Brenda and shiloh! :) Maureen, often times you can find those prices if you search your area. I find them at Aldi’s, food depot, flea markets and Sams.

  3. mmkkpro says:

    Great job sir,prepping is an art that is very much worth while.

  4. Randy says:

    Great Info! Thanks…
    I have checked and bought % gallon bucketsfrom Lowes that are food grade for 3$ a peice. Sure wish I could find the Gamma lids cheaper! But they are so much easier to use!

    Thanks Again … Randy

    • Hi Randy! Thats an awesome price on buckets. That is the only thing I don’t like when I right articles like this. Prices vary depending on where you live on products. I feel it shouldnt fluctuate to much though. :)

      JG

  5. Frank says:

    I like Oklahoma. Lived there for four years on Tinker before moving back to Missouri.

  6. Suburban says:

    Store what you eat. Eat what you store. Anyone who thinks it is a good idea to store foods that you do not eat day in and day out, and then suddenly change their diet when an emergency happens and you and your family is under all sorts of stress, has got to be crazy.

    Before you run out and buy a years supply of some sort of food, try eating it for a week.

    That said I like and store all the items you mention, but I am not counting on eating one recipe for a week not to mention a year. What follows are some comments on what you wrote, followed by a bit about what we store.

    “The thing I love about this recipe is that it can be changed in many different ways by adding left over meats, vegetables, dry vegetables, TVP, potatoes, etc.”

    Changing it like you suggest is the only way you are going to be able to eat this for a week, and I strongly suggest you plan many other recipes as well. This also means this is NOT the claimed “Year of Food Storage”, but only a small part of it. Without the added stored ingredients that are not listed, no one would eat this for a week.

    “Any kind of rice will do”

    Not quite. We love brown rice, and brown rice has far more nutrition than white. However brown rice does not store well long term unless frozen. For us this is worth doing, but don’t just throw brown rice in a bucket with an oxygen absorber and assume it will still be good 10 year later.

    In white rice the best for nutrition is parboiled (quick, not instant) rice.

    “buckets”

    If you are going to eat from your stored food on a daily basis (which I submit is the only thing that makes sense) then you are going to need smaller containers than 1 to 5 gallon buckets. You will also need a way to reseal those smaller containers. We use canning jars with a food saver machine which will suck the air out of the jar and seal it. We keep rice, beans, barley, lentils, and other dry foods stored this way. Unlike heat canning, using the food saver machine does not damage the seals on the lids so they can be reused almost indefinitely as long as you do not bend the lids.

    Food sources.

    Besides Sam’s Club and Costco, we find a much bigger selection of dried beans and such at Restaurant Depot. Since we like lentils and barley, we buy those in large bags at Restaurant Depot.

    “Bouillon”

    We have come to love Knorr Tomato/Chicken bouillon. It can be found in Hispanic grocery stores. We find that Sam’s Clubs in some areas carry this in large (4.4 lb?) buckets. We refill the smaller jars from the larger buckets.

    We also stock beef, chicken, and shrimp soup bases.

    Other storage foods and their sources:

    LDS cannery in #10 cans (if they carry it, you probably can’t find it less expensive elsewhere):
    dried black, pinto, or white beans
    non-fat dried milk
    white rice
    sugar
    white flour
    dried apple slices
    dried diced carrots
    elbow macaroni
    Oats
    dried refried beans (sounds crazy, but quite nice)

    Walton Feed in #10 cans:
    Vegetable Stew Blend
    dried Broccoli
    dried Cabbage
    dried celery
    dried red & green peppers
    dried diced potatoes
    TVP in ham, sausage, chicken, beef flavors (vegetarian meat substitute)
    dried spinach
    Tomato-Powder
    dried green beans
    Sweet Potato Dices

    Mountain House freeze dried in #10 cans
    Sweet Corn
    Sweet Peas
    both of these taste so much better than ordinary dried, that we are happy to pay the extra for them from Mountain House.

    Canned meats:
    DAK canned ham – Walmarts
    Canned Chicken – I can my own
    Canned Beef
    Canned Turkey
    Canned Tuna
    Canned Salmon
    Canned Sardines

    Canned fruits & vegetables:
    Tomatoes
    Rotel
    Peaches
    Pineapple

    Lots of spices including many dry varieties, Magi seasoning, many varieties of hot sauce.

    With the above and other things we eat every day from our food storage. I had for supper tonight a soup made from:

    water from our Berkey filter
    tomato/chicken bouillon
    home canned chicken thighs
    brown rice
    left over boiled potatoes
    dried mushrooms
    Rotel
    spinach
    green curry paste

    The foods you suggest make a good base, but without other things and many different recipes you do not have a usable food storage plan.

    • I agree with you 100% on many of your comments. As I suggested, this is only a quick way to get a years worth of food and then start storing things you love. In no way am I suggesting this be the only thing a family stores. It would be crazy lol.Me personally, I love beans and making different types of soup and so does my family. This recipes is basically like the 15 bean soup you can buy, only with rice and not as many beans in my opinion.I suppose common sense would say if you don’t like these things then don’t store this in your food storage. ;)

      Thank you for mentioning restaurant Depot, I had never heard of that place. :) I also wasn’t aware Sam’s carried bouillon in buckets, I have looked before trust me lol. I do think that each sams carries different items though. It sort of goes back to…ya gotta do your research in your area to find prices and what not.

      I agree with you about this being a good base, that is EXACTLY what this is. A base to start food storage. It is Not the only thing a person should have, it is only a start to make sure you actually DO have something verses nothing. :)

      Thanks for the input and help suburban :)

      JG

      • Suburban says:

        “Thank you for mentioning restaurant Depot, I had never heard of that place.”

        http://www.restaurantdepot.com/

        It is a wholesale supplier to Restaurants with stores in many parts of the country. I learned about it from SurvivalBlog. Restaurant Depot requires a free membership to enter. You need to given them a copy of a resale or tax exempt certificate to join. It does not have to be from a restaurant, a sales tax certificate from any business will do. This is a wonderful place to buy produce in bulk. We buy cases of beefsteak tomatoes there, and bought the chicken I canned there.

        ” I also wasn’t aware Sam’s carried bouillon in buckets”

        http://www.samsclub.com/sams/knorr-chicken-flavor-bouillon-4-4-lb-bucket/149427.ip?navAction=

        http://www.samsclub.com/sams/knorr-tomato-bouillon-w-chicken-flavor-4-4lbs/115150.ip?navAction=

        Every store carries a different selection so call around when looking for stuff like this. One Sam’s in our area only has the Chicken Bouillon in buckets, but another has both the Chicken and our favorite Tomato/Chicken. We can also get the buckets at Restaurant Depot.

      • mike camp says:

        Hi, love the article and the fact that you give people hope, a years worth of food for $300 is a deal, and that gives people without a lot of money hope and probably helps them make the leap too knowing it is not expensive. I agree, a drastic change in diet is hard, but having a years worth of food beats the heck out of having a weeks worth, and people can adapt to any food source if that is what they have, so all in all I think you have delivered some great advice to everyone, especially new people. I have been a prepper forever, and find this info very useful too. again, thanks for helping people out.

        • Terri says:

          I agree Mike, seeing the prices of the long-term storage freeze dried foods can give a person heartburn. I live in an area that has very few options for buying – I do have a GFS (Gordon Food Stores) relatively close and have purchased a few things each time I go. I’m also big on the buy one get one for the food storage deals a the local Winn Dixie. Just purchased a pressure canner that I am waiting patiently on the arrival so that I can begin canning. the start up costs are a little painful, but if I don’t have water to cook my beans later, a storage pantry full of dried beans is worthless.

      • Norm says:

        Like the recipe, did not know that about the onions, nice. One of the things I have done to increase flavor variety is to store dried seasonings and dry gravy mixes from Sams along with small quantities (due to prices) of Freeze Dried Beef and Chicken. Currently have in 25+ year storage Pintos, Blacks, Navys, Rice, Tortillia ingredients, the above items, and assorted dried fruits from local grocery stores on sale, sprout seeds and those Dak canned hams that have a 5-7 year shelf life as sold. Couple things I did not see here (may have missed it) is Powdered milk and Oats (from LDS about 60 miles away – great people, will bend over backwards to help you) . I preferred the Mylar bag and OZ in buckets method and would caution about the food grade buckets as not all are exactly what they claim to be and you dont want to find out about air flow when you need the contents. A minature orchard of dwarf fruit trees (2 apple, cherry, peach, pear, nectarine) that only takes up a 12′ x 20′ area, along with some mulberry and chestnut bushes on the perimeter. Currently have enough for 1.5-2 years for 4 people for less than $2000 including bags, buckets, impulse sealer, gammas etc. stacked in a bedroom closet. A few cast iron items and water filter systems were tossed in as well – maybe 250.00 worth and 100.00 for the plants. Planned primary method and a secondary backup for everything (think eggs in one basket) so it could be done for less. Wish I had found this site about 2 years ago though, would have saved a lot of time. You dont need buckets of money to be prepped.

  7. Mikie says:

    good ‘food for thought”. i’m rather new to the prepping stuff, and i have a few questions that i bet you could help with..

  8. Cindy in Louisiana says:

    Thanks so much for this post. I think it will come in very handy.

  9. Thanks! We are working on our food now and MRE’s are expensive.

    • Oh my goodness yes they are! and full of salt to which makes you thirsty :) As mentioned above, this plan is a great base plan. It should not be the only thing you store though. It is a plan to make sure you have something to eat, but should not be the only thing. Boy would ya get tired of this day in and day out lol!! There are many ways to build food storage, this is a simple start. :)

      JG

  10. I wish I could get some of those prices in this area!

  11. Rob Work says:

    My question is where do you find that much bullion for the price?

  12. you can get a big #10 of MSG Free red #40 Free chicken or beef bullion from http://www.augasonfarms.com thats where I get ours. Just watch the daily or bi weekly deals to get what you want cheaper if you can wait! Heather

  13. Tammy May says:

    Link please? On iPhone and it only shows half an article and no link to full story

  14. Rob Work says:

    thanks Heather!

  15. Eric Power says:

    Here is something you may want to consider. My wife and I recently discovered that some grocery stores(Kroger, Sam’s Club etc) will give you their food grade buckets for FREE. Just give them a call to confirm they do this and if they do they will set them aside for pickup later. Ours have come from the bakery and were used for icing. They may come to you dirty but it’s a small price to pay for a free bucket!  Granted you aren’t getting gamma lids with them, but it knocks off $50 from your total Amt. 

  16. I just looked at the calories in the soup, made as directed. A full batch has about 1650 calories. That is the what one adult needs per day. It’s not going to feed 4 people for two days, even if two of the people are children. It may not feed even ONE person a day, if the person is doing hard physical labor like cutting and hauling wood to cook with, hauling water, etc.

    • A full batch without adding meats is lower in calories than a person working *extremely* hard needs, but as far as nutritional value, with the exception of Vitamin B12, it does have all the vitamins, proteins etc that is needed. My doctor has told me a person can live on 1000 calories a day with the right vitamins and nutritional foods. An average person in today’s society lives on 1800, to 2500 calories a day and is the leading cause of people being overweight and obese. I have personally made this on a number of occasions and it last my family of four for about 3 days. (Me, my husband, my 13 year old and my 10 year old, granted on the 3rd day we usually don’t want anymore, but its there if we are out of food.)

      As suggested, we make bread with it and add meat to it. We often also add Lima beans and corn, which adds calories and more protein.

      Also as suggested, this is only a base line and once achieved people should add foods they want and desire. There are many people who do not have the money to store as much as they need or want as quickly as they need. This is only one method to ensure your family will be fed in hard times if you have nothing else or until you can get something else. This is not a plan for long term, eat only this food to survive. Perhaps I should have stated that more firmly in the article.

      Thank you for pointing out the calorie content and your thoughts. It is appreciated:)

      JG

      • Suburban says:

        “My doctor has told me a person can live on 1000 calories a day with the right vitamins and nutritional foods.”

        Yes for a while, but they will be losing weight and eventually strength. I need to lose weight so I eat 1500 or less calories a day, but I try not to go under 1000 cal for more than a day because it can be dangerous to the health.

        The USDA guidelines for an average person assume 2000 calories a day, which is a good target when calculating how much food to store.

        • We will just have to agree to disagree my friend :) Every person is different and every persons dietary needs are different so it really isn’t fair of either of use to say who should eat what. I could never consume 2000 calories a day and most people that do (if not doing cardio daily) are over weight.
          That being said, as I have pointed out several time, this suggested food storage is only to be used as a base to ensure you have a years worth of food while you build the rest of your storage. It is not to be used as the only source of food a person should eat. Most people reading this understand that it would be impossible to eat this day in and day out as a sole diet without becoming sick and tired of it lol. That is why I said its a base for building upon. If it comes down to people not having any food at all at least they would have this verses starving to death.

          JG

  17. Randy says:

    Too many complaints folks!! This is a great starting point. If you have 2000lbs of food put up for 2000 calories a day, GREAT! But if not, this is a cheap way to sustain your family! Any adds to this you can get will be a bonus, take a pellet gun or 22 or stick and find you a rabbit or couple of pigeons or some other critter, you will be adding a lot to this.
    JUST MAKE SURE you have plenty of drinking water!

  18. We have everything you need in large or small quantities!

    • A cheap source of the 5-gallon plastic buckets is Firehouse Sub restaurants. They sell their used pickle buckets for $2 each. This is cheaper than Home Depot which charges like $2 for the bucket and another $1.38 for the lid.

  19. Wooo hooo I went to sams today and I got THREE 2 gallon buckets for free. That is the first time Sam’s has ever given me buckets lol. Just be careful folks!! When I went to check out she was scanning the items i had on the bottom of my cart and scanned the icing bucket and it rang up 16 dollars. I had to make them aware it was a free used bucket lol

    JG

  20. slowgoer says:

    Have you tried letting the beans soak over night to reduce cooking time? Might cut the fuel consumption in half by doing so.

    • Oh yes for sure, :) I thought that was a given lol. When I make this, it still takes about 2 hours for all of it to cook through. How long do yours usually take to cook? Maybe I can turn the heat up or something?

      JG

  21. The problem with all of these LT food storage places is there are VERY expensive! Most people can not afford to stock up because they can not affod to feed a family of 4 at $25.00 or more per CAN of item! I have been to probably every LT storage site on the internet and honestly can’t afford to buy off of their sites! I know it doesn’t take that much money to package the items offered. If they offered Lt storage at a decent price and a discount if you pick it up in person instead of shipping not only would they sell more of their products but more people would be able to stock up. if the item cost $5.00 to package and you sold for $8.00 you will still be makinga profit (which it seems to me this is about) but instead of selling a few hundred items, thousands of items would be sold. Just a thought.

    • I agree, that is why so many people in the prepper community are always looking for good ways to store items that are cost effective. The LDS cannery is a wonderful place to get items because you can the items yourself so there is no shipping or handling charge.

      I think sometimes that people forget that they can improvise when it comes to how they do things like food storage. A good example is sugar. You can buy a bucket of sugar for over 100 dollars or you can go to sams and get a free bucket, then buy 20 pond bags for 15 dollars and pour them into the bucket, saving you a lot of money.

      Its all about preparing and research.

      Jg

      • Brilliant! Thank you so much! My family has just recently started prepping. We have some food set by, but this will ensure we have a year’s supply of the bare minimum and we can build from there.
        Plus, I am from Oklahoma and in a few year’s we will be moving back to help my mother. You are an inspiration. Thank you.

        • I am from oklahoma to!! We moved to Georgia a little over a year ago and I sure miss it. But I don’t miss the tornado’s. People in oklahoma need a food storage for sure because of that right there. I can not count how many times we lost powers for days because of them. Do not forget to add grill/charcoal and an alternate way to cook in case you do lose power. http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/04/alternative-cooking-cooking-and-recipes-without-gas-or-electric.html
          One thing I love about having these things in food storage is that if you live in a community that loses power and lets say they are trapped for some reason (ice storm like oklahoma had a few years back) Then you can whip up a big pot of this and share with friends and neighbors.

          JG

          • jedi1111 says:

            That storage plan  is way too bean heavy. You would be in gastric distress if you ate that diet for a week.  Especially if you are over 40 and the old colon ain’t what it used to be.

          • Thank you Jedi. It does have a few different beans in it, but as stated it is not meant for a primary diet and other food should be stored as well. This is a quick and cheap way to make sure you have food that will last while you build the rest of your storage. I suppose one could also store Beano (gas pills) lol JK JK

            JG

  22. Stephanie says:

    Thanks for the post – good food for thought! I have a question – how long can this be stored once it’s sealed up? Thanks!

  23. If packaged correctly for many many years. :)

  24. To save even more money, call your local large grocery chain bakery and ask to buy their frosting buckets. I pay $1 for a 5 gallon bucket with lid, and get the 1 gallon buckets at 2 for $1. They are food grade, all white and the lids seal super tight. They usually wash them for me too! I especially like the rectangular ones as they ‘fit’ better when lining up on shelves and in my truck bed. 

    • For sure!! i get a lot of mine there to. They are free where I get them but they never wash them out and that stuff is THICK lol. You can also buy them for two dollars a bucket at fire house sub and the proceeds go to the fire stations. all of it does, not just a percentage :)

      JG

  25. tabby says:

    Question? Is the amounts based on solid ounces or fluid ounces? for instance, 8 ounces is a cup, right? So would I just use a 1-cup measure, or would I have to weigh this out on a scale to get the correct amounts? So 2 oz would be a 1/4 cup? Cups would be easier for American users. I know Europe uses ounces, etc.. I always get confused over fluid ounces being somehow different from weights.
    Also a few comments: if you eat beans on a weekly basis, your body develops the enzymes necessary to digest them and you won’t be in intestinal distress like the one commenter was worried about. Another thing, if you soak the beans and drain, rinse and re-soak twice before boiling, the foam is the ‘gas’ and it will be rinsed off and not bother you. I always skim off the foam as it is cooking also. And beans that are really OLD like 20 years or more will not soften up but are usually edible still as crunchy as they are, depending on your teeth. Bean soups, salads or any bean dish that has been sitting out between the temperature of 40 degrees up to 140 degrees for more than 2 hours can develop botulism toxins and needs to be re-heated to 185 degrees to kill the botulism. It is easier just to boil it because you can tell boiling looks like without a thermometer. Just bring it to actual ‘boiling’ to not waste fuel, stirring often.
    And thanks for posting this recipe. I am pointing all my friends to this. Most of us can handle a bean-and-rice diet but a heavily wheat-based diet is going to cause sudden gluten-problems for some people after a disaster. THAT would be an ugly surprise. Talk about the “SHtF”…..

  26. Nate Bozung says:

    I’ve got a question! Is the barley you are using hulled, pot, or pearl barley?

    • Well, most people prefer pearled barley because it cooks in about an hour. It is the most common form of barley, but not the most nutritious. While hulled barley loses only the thick outer hull in the milling process, pearl barley is stripped of the nutritious bran layer as well, leaving just the “pearl” inside. Despite this, it’s still fairly nutritious.

      Hulled Barley is the least processed form of barley, with just the outermost hull removed. While it’s chewier and slower to cook than more processed forms of barley, it’s rich in fiber and really good for you.

      Pot barley isn’t as heavily processed as pearl barley, in that the endosperm is left intact, along with the inner pearl of the kernel. It takes about an hour to cook.

      That being said we keep a stock of hulled and pearl barley in our storage. Ultimately the choice is up to you.

      JG

  27. crypter says:

    I’m having trouble finding theses prices around here. Beans, etc are going for around 1.25/lb and bouillon is way more than shown. Anyone have any sources?

  28. Tonyp says:

    Just was forwarded your website, WOW great site, and this article is such a confirmation for us., We pack VERY similar for families in our store. I will be pointing folks to this as a reference. We are located in SW Missouri. Lots of folks prepping here, and even more waking up.

    • hugh kindred says:

      Very interesting, I would like to start putting something like this together but have to convince my better half. One question/suggestion. I have a MIG welder. Would it be possible to use welding gas (CO2/Argon) in the buckets? Inert gas, would displace normal air. Just a thought.

  29. Jøel King says:

    I’m new to prepping and was looking around Amazon. I found an “Emergency Food Kit of Lentils” plus wheat and cornmeal buckets. Prices right around $60. Is this a good price or should I just go and put it all together myself?

    http://www.amazon.com/Servings-Lentils-Emergency-Reliance%C2%AE-ThriveTM/dp/B0091DUWLY/ref=sr_1_35?ie=UTF8&qid=1354481480&sr=8-35&keywords=Shelf+Reliance

    • That link shows a bucket for $99.00 for 44 pounds of lentils. Where we live its about a dollar (less than that is its on sale) for 1 pound. So we would pay about 44 dollars for that bucket. If I were you I would shop around and see what you can find. If you dont want the hassle of buying them buy the bag and placing them in a bucket with an oxygen absorber yourself then sure, go ahead and get it. But I would consider doing the manual labor yourself, you could buy so much more with the money you save.

      JG :)

  30. hugh kindred says:

    A question on oxygen absorbers. I have a small welding rig and keep a tank of inert gas for it. (argon and a trace of co2) Could a person put a hose to the bottom of the bucket and flush it with the gas while putting the lid on?

  31. Angel House says:

    Hi Cari,
    I have a question. In FL and also in Central America, where I spent a lot of time growing up, weevils get in things like rice, beans, flour, gains, etc.
    They seem to hatch out when you have the food around for a while…. This stuff is stored in silos before going to be bagged and its on the shelf a while with the eggs in it already. The little bugs are black and they scurry around putting your kids off their feed if they manage to hatch out. So, I bring stuff home and if it’s not something I’m going to use soon (big bags, etc) I first put in the Freezer for a couple days, then take out and store normally. That kills the eggs so they don’t Hatch. Much like things get frozen out in harsher winters than I’m used to. Have you actually Stored these things for a year or more to see if the bugs hatch out?

  32. Christopher de Vidal says:

    I did a nutritional analysis on this recipe:
    http://nutritiondata.self.com/services/referral?messageKey=e42f52cdf9f9a98b014f9af24b42cc19

    (Three tablespoons equals nine cubes of bouillon.) If you do not add any other meats, vegetables, potatoes or seasonings and you split this amongst four people and stretch it to two days, you get about 200 calories per person, per day. If an adult is completely sedentary he will still burn around 2,000 calories per day. You’ll burn much more in a SHTF scenario where you’re doing lots of walking, lifting, digging, etc.

    So yes, this recipe is very much, as the title says, “supplemental.” You _must_ store significantly more calories. Definitely expect to add many more meats, vegetables, potatoes and seasonings. Especially meats, potatoes and fats (such as the optional olive oil/butter).

    DON’T GET ME WRONG! It’s a great recipe! Just needs much more. I’d also like to see how to switch out the barley for something gluten-free.

    • Absolutely this is just a supplemental recipe. As stated one should add meat and vegetables to the soup! :) I understand what your saying about the calories however, this is not a recipe for a SHTF scenario where one would be working extra hard and burning more calories. It is simply a plan for home food storage for hard times.

      Thank you so much for all your hard research and I am sure it will come in very handy for those who had intended to use this for a SHTF plan and make them see they need much more.

      JG :)

  33. Add a little hot sauce and a tablespoon of sugar you get a nice hot and sour soup base that ROCKS!

  34. why the storage proportion is : 8-2-2-2-0,5-0,5
    and in the recipe is : 8-2-2-2-1-1 ??????

  35. Dan-think on your feet and find a place near you? When you look hard enough, you can find any reason to like a business, and eventually you will run out of options. Our current administration and legislators are ruining this country better and faster than Wal-Mart….

  36. I have been leery of storing dried beans only because I have heard they take forever to cook. Is there a quicker way for them to cook especially in a SHTF scenario?

    • They do make instant red kidney beans now. I would think that in a SHTF scenario one would be happy to have food even if it took a little longer to cook verses starve. However as stated in the article, this is not the ONLY food one should have in food storage. It is a base so that you know you have something instead of nothing.

  37. O.K. I’ll bite. Why would anyone want to store a years worth of food when you can replenish with fresh food as you consume it. Is it some kind of apocalyptic paranoia trip?

  38. Check your local health food store for bulk items, if they don’t have in stock, odds are they can order for you :-)

  39. Its called prepping for emergancy like for instance we live in an earthquake and tornado area and we live in a very rural area, if a massive earthquake were to happen help would not make it to us for a long time so we take care of ourselves.

  40. James, I don’t necessarily store items for a apocalyptic paranoia trip…I store for in case of job loss, illness or in my case, being self employed and work is slow. This is my “insurance” that enables my family to eat AND pay the bills, rather than getting behind on paying bills. Hope this enlightens others.

  41. James, I don’t necessarily store items for a apocalyptic paranoia trip…I store for in case of job loss, illness or in my case, being self employed and work is slow. This is my “insurance” that enables my family to eat AND pay the bills, rather than getting behind on paying bills. Hope this enlightens others.

  42. James, I don’t necessarily store items for a apocalyptic paranoia trip…I store for in case of job loss, illness or in my case, being self employed and work is slow. This is my “insurance” that enables my family to eat AND pay the bills, rather than getting behind on paying bills. Hope this enlightens others.

  43. You can choose to shop where you like. The author is simply stating where she purchased her items.

  44. You can choose to shop where you like. The author is simply stating where she purchased her items.

  45. You can choose to shop where you like. The author is simply stating where she purchased her items.

  46. They do make instant red kidney beans now. I would think that in a SHTF scenario one would be happy to have food even if it took a little longer to cook verses starve. However as stated in the article, this is not the ONLY food one should have in food storage. It is a base so that you know you have something instead of nothing.

  47. They do make instant red kidney beans now. I would think that in a SHTF scenario one would be happy to have food even if it took a little longer to cook verses starve. However as stated in the article, this is not the ONLY food one should have in food storage. It is a base so that you know you have something instead of nothing.

  48. They do make instant red kidney beans now. I would think that in a SHTF scenario one would be happy to have food even if it took a little longer to cook verses starve. However as stated in the article, this is not the ONLY food one should have in food storage. It is a base so that you know you have something instead of nothing.

  49. Storage proportions are in pounds and recipe proportions are in ounces.

  50. Storage proportions are in pounds and recipe proportions are in ounces.

  51. Storage proportions are in pounds and recipe proportions are in ounces.

  52. Thank you Christina. I had no idea why one would ever need a year’s worth of food on hand. You suggested that you store food and I suppose water, because help might not be forthcoming after a natural disaster. Can you tell me the last time someone in the U.S. starved to death because they didn’t get assistance from emergency crews after a disaster? I’d bet it was a long time ago. Our transportation and communication resources are advanced enough where I doubt any group or individual would be allowed to starve to death because help couldn’t get to them. Since you live in a rural area, I would think the possibility of getting emergency assistance was even greater. Population is sparse where you live, I imagine, and food and water and blankets and other such aid could be brought in by helicopter or air dropped near you even if the roads were destroyed. Anyway, good luck with the food storage. I hope you never have to use it.

    • Brooke F says:

      James Lee Phelan, have you seen the news footage after Katrina?   I live in Louisiana about 3 hours by car from New Orleans.  I could have walked to New Orleans much faster than the federal government responded with water and food.  I’m glad you trust the government so much, but the point of being prepared is NOT to depend on someone with a helicopter to drop “food and water and blankets and other such aid”.

  53. Thank you Christina. I had no idea why one would ever need a year’s worth of food on hand. You suggested that you store food and I suppose water, because help might not be forthcoming after a natural disaster. Can you tell me the last time someone in the U.S. starved to death because they didn’t get assistance from emergency crews after a disaster? I’d bet it was a long time ago. Our transportation and communication resources are advanced enough where I doubt any group or individual would be allowed to starve to death because help couldn’t get to them. Since you live in a rural area, I would think the possibility of getting emergency assistance was even greater. Population is sparse where you live, I imagine, and food and water and blankets and other such aid could be brought in by helicopter or air dropped near you even if the roads were destroyed. Anyway, good luck with the food storage. I hope you never have to use it.

  54. Thank you Christina. I had no idea why one would ever need a year’s worth of food on hand. You suggested that you store food and I suppose water, because help might not be forthcoming after a natural disaster. Can you tell me the last time someone in the U.S. starved to death because they didn’t get assistance from emergency crews after a disaster? I’d bet it was a long time ago. Our transportation and communication resources are advanced enough where I doubt any group or individual would be allowed to starve to death because help couldn’t get to them. Since you live in a rural area, I would think the possibility of getting emergency assistance was even greater. Population is sparse where you live, I imagine, and food and water and blankets and other such aid could be brought in by helicopter or air dropped near you even if the roads were destroyed. Anyway, good luck with the food storage. I hope you never have to use it.

  55. Liz King says:

    This would be a pretty severe diet by US standards. May take a little getting used to. Better put in some pepto and laxatives. Just in case.

  56. Liz King says:

    This would be a pretty severe diet by US standards. May take a little getting used to. Better put in some pepto and laxatives. Just in case.

  57. Liz King says:

    This would be a pretty severe diet by US standards. May take a little getting used to. Better put in some pepto and laxatives. Just in case.

  58. Liz King says:

    Hey Diane, do you know somewhere on the net I found a recipe to make instant beans? Hum, let’s see. Anyway, dry beans take up so much less space. I thought about “instant” but if the SHTF I’ll have to pressure can, the easiest way to cook them!

  59. Liz King says:

    Hey Diane, do you know somewhere on the net I found a recipe to make instant beans? Hum, let’s see. Anyway, dry beans take up so much less space. I thought about “instant” but if the SHTF I’ll have to pressure can, the easiest way to cook them!

  60. Liz King says:

    Hey Diane, do you know somewhere on the net I found a recipe to make instant beans? Hum, let’s see. Anyway, dry beans take up so much less space. I thought about “instant” but if the SHTF I’ll have to pressure can, the easiest way to cook them!

  61. ok , but i dont understand :/ i’m french and prefere use kilogramme.
    1 Pound = 16 Ounces —> http://www.asknumbers.com/PoundsToOuncesConversion.aspx
    so , it dont change proportion ?
    i realize this PDF in french , and i have some difficults to solve this probleme of proportion in Kg :
    http://www.fichier-pdf.fr/2013/04/02/1anreservealimentaire-1/
    help me please , and translate the pdf if you want to share it ;)

  62. Sherri Underwood Hodgson I have a friend that is interested in this. She asked how long the food could be stored in this manner. I’m not sure what to tell her. I usually store my items in mylar.

  63. Sherri Underwood Hodgson I have a friend that is interested in this. She asked how long the food could be stored in this manner. I’m not sure what to tell her. I usually store my items in mylar.

  64. Sherri Underwood Hodgson I have a friend that is interested in this. She asked how long the food could be stored in this manner. I’m not sure what to tell her. I usually store my items in mylar.

  65. It’s a pain but well worth the effort to soak 12-24hrs. Or you can precook and dehydrate! This should also last the year if done properly :-)

  66. Hans Freitag says:

    and Homeland Security and MSNBC are saying that people that are doing this are Hoarders and should be prosecuted if they dont share with nieghbors during disasters. They also say they have the right to take it from you and distribute it….if you do store your own supply do not share that information with anyone…

  67. Hans Freitag says:

    not being paranoid just listening to what the news is saying

  68. Hans Freitag says:

    Sherri just soak them over night. you just have to plan ahead. Also they will double or triple in size when you soak them. So fill a container 1/3 full. Then fill it with water. The next day the container will be 2/3 full to completely full. Do not do this in a sealed glass container. Leave the lid on loose when you do this. Dont forget to store lots of Seasonings. Chili powders, Cumin, Curryies and such. Makes SHTF scenarios more livable and less boring

  69. Herbal Pagan says:

    Honeyville Grain now offers a “quick cook” dried bean in #10 can. It’s more expensive though. It does take a long time to prepare dried beans, but you can mitigate that some by canning some ahead of time for the occasion “quick” grab. It’s still worth it to have them on hand, properly packed, they will last 30 years, so that’s something to consider.

  70. Hans Freitag says:

    Beans and rice are also less likely to be stolen ……at first……oh and dont forget cooking oil

  71. Brian Kelsey says:

    My wife made baked beans for dinner this evening from scratch. (We always cook this way.) She boils the beans for an hour to an hour and a half. Then she mixes the other ingredients in with the beans and bakes them. (Of course the baking process wont be used with all types of beans.)

  72. Brian Kelsey says:

    We replenish most of our supplies at harvest time when we can/freeze/dry everything for the next year. We grow most of our own food for the year and preserve it as it becomes ready. Very large garden. tastes better then anything I get at the store.

    It’s not about whether or not emergency help will arrive in a timely manner. It’s a matter of taking responsibility for ourselves and our families. If everyone actually did that government help after disasters would be unnecessary. But, yeah, why take responsibility when you can wait on someone else to bail you out.

  73. Thanks everyone! I have been keeping cans of different kinds of beans and wanted to add dry ones but because of their cooking time chose to stay away from them. Herbal Pagan – thanks about the Honeyville Grain tip – I am an Independent Consultant with the THRIVE food line and we also sell the instant ones in the #10 cans but I try to be conservative with how my $$$ is being stretched so if it’s cheaper to get the dry ones and a quicker way to cook them, then I’m game. I’ve also been buying my #10 cans for primary things like meats and such since I have not yet canned – we all know how pricey the cans can get so I try to stretch it out. ;)

  74. James – there are different reasons why we all prep and store food/water up. Some of us do not want to rely on others any more than needed. We take too much for granted and think we live in a rosey world where nothing bad is going to happen and if it does, the calvary will come in and save us. We all can learn a lot from history and what is going on around us right now. Our economy is still shaky and so is the dollar. I would be curious as to what people who lived through Katrina or any other type of disaster would say about the gov’t coming in to save them and how long it took for them to get the “real” help they needed.

  75. And, another reason, if you have a family member, neighbor, co-worker or anyone else who has experienced a hardship or disaster of some sorts, it allows you to step up and help them in their time of need if one choose too. ;)

  76. Thanks Brian, I’m not familiar with your movement and was trying to understand the reasons for having a year’s worth of food always on hand. The ability to care for your own family in the unlikely event of a natural disaster that prevents you from accessing food and water for a year is laudable. But I wouldn’t say that people who don’t share your fears and fail to put up that much food will be guilty of mooching off of the government in the event of a catastrophic event. In times of disaster we as a nation pitch in to help those who are suffering and insure that there is plenty of food, water, clothing and other necessary supplies for as long as it takes. In the same way that you, either personally and/or with your tax dollars, pitched in to help those victims of Katrina or the many tornado victims in Missouri and elsewhere last year. And Sheri, I admire your desire to be as self-sufficient as possible. I guess I don’t get the one year part as I can’t imagine this country letting any region go without access to food resources for that long. As to the Katrina victims, if they had stored food it was probably washed away in the flood, or otherwise contaminated. The slow response to that disaster hopefully was a wake up call and we won’t see the like of that level of incompetence again. Thanks again to all of you for answering my questions. I admire your group even though I don’t have the same worries.

  77. Beth Swiney says:

    You can also can them and then all you have to do is heat them up

  78. James, that’s cool, I understand where you are coming from. Some of us have been watching things closely that are going on in the world today and with our country. I went to an Emergency Preparedness Workshop back in Feb – which at that time we were only shooting for 3 month supply in our family – at this event, there were two well known gov’t reps from EMPact America. These two individuals educated us on the threat of an EMP attack (like N Korea has the capability of doing) along with solar flares (which we are 150 years over due for). Both of these events have the capability of taking down our electrical grid which is not protected from these events. They stated, depending on how bad either event is, that we would look at anywhere from 1-10+ years till electric is back up and running! These type of events will fry anything electrical or computer operated – including vehicles. Hearing these two experts talk worried my husband and I that if either of these events happened, how could we look our children in the face and tell them we could not feed them or give them their basic life needs. These experts also told us not to rely on the gov’t because they will not have the resources to help the country out if this happened. My husband and I are not even near the 3 month supply let alone the year but we keep stocking up to get there. We will be gardening this year and canning for our first time. We are also looking into chickens and possibly aquaponics. We have many skills to learn but are also networking with others and building a group up to be of support to one another. That’s “our” story, lol. Sorry so long! :)

  79. This is not intended as the only source of food, it is supplemental. A plan that you can do quickly and then build up other food like meat and vegetables, noodles etc..

  80. Wayranch says:

    Just another idea for cooking this. If you are trying to conserve fuel for cooking you could bring this to a boil and then use a heat box also called a wonder oven. The idea is to cook your food and use as little fuel as possible. I tried this last week with a chicken barley soup and it worked great! I brought my soup to a good boil and then packed it up in a box and blankets. It was steaming hot when I pulled it out of the blankets 7 hours later.
    Here is a video I found that shows the process. Easy and no extra fancy items needed. Hope this helps.

    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Wn4YlBHEYmI

  81. WesMidwest says:

    I love lists! They make the prepping process a lot more manageable.

    Of course, you have to arrange to have plenty of clean water to make this work. Your plan looks like a good foundation. However, I believe variety is crucial in a long-term survival situation. We need it to keep up morale. So my suggestion is to do as you have shared, THEN begin to augment the prep with creative ways to make the eating experience more interesting.

    Wes T.
    Indiana
    SuccessfulSurvival.net