By August 13, 2012 Read More →

Hurricane Andrew

Ever since I got out of the Army back in ’62, I have been “prepping”.  A little here and there, as my income would allow, and picking up bargains at flea markets, 2nd hand stores, yard sales, etc…  I could see, even back then, that hard times were sure to follow the reckless spending programs that the government (both parties) was persuing.  In ’90 the job market where I was living was in bad shape and I took on some contract work down in Florida.  This required me to leave my family, and pack up my tools and equipment in my pickup/camper, and drive down there.  I didn’t know how long I’d be there, but at least it was fairly good money, and I’d be able to send it home to keep my family going.

In September of ’91, I was in Homestead, Florida, when hurricane  Andrew hit.  As most folks probably remember, that was the costliest storm in history, up to that point.  What most don’t know, is that there was a lot to the story that never made the news.  First, let me say that the storm itself was no big deal.  There was not much of a “surge” or flooding as hurricanes go, but there were over 40 tornadoes wrapped up in that storm!  That was what caused all the destruction.

Homestead is a small town, agricultural center, some 50 miles south of Miami, at the point where the Florida Keys begin.  It is Flat, and the nearest “high ground” is “mount trashmore” the county landfill (dump).  There is a “Pass” on the way to Everglades National park, and a sign reads “elevation 3ft.”  Most of the population is farm workers, and immigrant farm labor.  Called “pickers” they are itinerant, often un-documented aliens.  Officially, the death toll was about 150 people, but there was a lot of talk about white government refrigerator trucks, leaving with body bags for weeks after the storm.

[disaster-author]LarryC [/disaster-author]



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