By August 19, 2012 Read More →

The Dot Com Crash

The disaster that really woke me up was the ‘dot.com-crash’ of 2000.  It hit a LOT of other people as well.

Four DC-area high-tech companies failed out from under me in 14 months.  I went from $90k a year to $0 a year in a little over a year.  I qualified for $300/week in unemployment for 6 months.  I lost the house I had lived in for 15 years.  I got to keep 4 months worth of stored food, my cooking gear, my camping gear, a ‘mostly dead’ Dodge minivan (home) and an old $700 Toyota Corolla, and lived in a $40/week campground (which, by the way, was in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet) for 8 months, before moving into a ‘crack house’ building, owned by friends, who let me slide on the deposit.

It took 4 years to get a ‘real’ job again (not selling overpriced vacuum cleaners on commission, loading trucks, or building kitchen cabinets for minimum wage).

What I learned from the disaster:

  1. if you are at least somewhat prepared, you can probably survive the first month or so, that will ruin the unprepared quickly.
  2. if you are around ‘neighbors’, of any sort, (preferably the weekend sort), and you can cook food that makes them drool, 99x out 100, they will pay you for a plate-full.
  3. if you can create some sort of useful or showy handcraft items that the general population CAN’T create,  you will get buyers, even in isolated conditions.
  4. When you get to the point that you feel like just putting a gun in your mouth, wait until noon the next day.  You will most likely have changed your mind.

[disaster-author]Ken A.[/disaster-author]



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4 Comments on "The Dot Com Crash"

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  1. Empress says:

    The gun to the head part is so true. we did that sort of thing regularly, but it was when DH was in a war zone, trying to support our family. when it got too bad for him, I told him to wait till morning, same was true for me, worked every time.

  2.   So glad you  made it through some hard times. Sounds like your preps and ingenuity served well.  Thanks for sharing your experience, Ken.

  3. Being ready for anything is better.

  4. should be ready at all times