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By November 13, 2012 Read More →

Canning Meatloaf Balls

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Mom’s Meatloaf Ball’s

Jalapeno Gal

(I got about 7 quart jars out of the recipe I am sharing.)

Canning meatloaf balls can be a pleasure to add to food storage.  In the long run, it can save you money when the price of meat sky rockets and its easy to grab a jar if your hungry or want to make meatloaf balls for dinner.

There are a few different ways to make meatloaf balls out there.  The way I do it is a little different from your basic recipe, but tastes delicious.  Keep in mind, if you prefer the traditional way, then please do that way.

Ingredients:

  • 6-7 pounds of lean hamburger (I use Angus 90/10)
  • 6 large eggs, powdered
  • 3 cups whole wheat bread crumbs (or plain)
  • 2 sweet yellow onions, diced (about 1 1/2 cups when finely diced
  • 2-3 teaspoons salt (to taste)
  • 2-3 teaspoons black pepper (to taste)
  • 3/4 cup Worcestershire Sauce (original)
  • 1 cup powdered milk, prepared
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil for sauteing onions and garlic

For the Glaze:

  • 2 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 6 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce (original)
  • 3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

Directions:

  1. Combine all the ingredients to make the glaze.  Mix well and set aside.
  2. Adjust your oven rack to lower middle position.  Preheat oven to 350° F.
  3. Heat vegetable oil in a pan on medium-high heat.  Sauté the onions and garlic until onions are caramelized and golden brown.  (about 5 minutes string occasionally.)  This will bring out the sweetness of the onion.
  4. In a small mixing bowl, combine your wet ingredients;  Eggs, milk, Worcestershire sauce, and half of the glaze you made earlier.  Use a fork to mix well.
  5. In a large mixing bowl, combine meat, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, browned onion/garlic mix, and wet ingredients.
  6. Using your hands mix ingredients quickly.  You don’t want to overwork it but you want everything distributed evenly.
  7. Form mixture into 2 inch round balls and place on 2 baking sheets.
  8. Bake at 350° for about 25 minutes or until balls are firm.

While your meatballs are baking, get your pressure canner and supplies ready.  Put your extra glaze in a sauce pan and get warm but not boiling.  You may even want to make another batch of glaze at this time.  It really depends on how much glaze you want to add to the jars.

After your meatballs are cooked:

  1. Using wide mouth quart jars, place your meatballs in the jar and fill about half way.
  2. Spoon in your glaze sauce until jar is about half full.
  3. Fill jar the rest of the way with meatballs leaving a generous 1 inch head space.
  4. You can add one or 2 more tablespoons of sauce on top of those meatballs if you want, but it isn’t necessary.
  5. Remove air by gently tapping the jar on a dish towel or using a plastic utensil to push the meatballs around.  Be careful not to smash them or cut them.
  6. Wipe your rims with a clean paper towel dipped in white vinegar.
  7. Put on lids and ringers and screw it finger tight.
  8. Place jars in your pressure canner, add water and 2 teaspoons white vinegar (to avoid rusting or mineral buildup) and vent for 10 full minutes.
  9. Bring to 11 pounds of pressure and process quart jars for 90 minutes.  (pints for 75).  If your manual suggests a different time and pounds of pressure, then follow your manual for canning ground beef.
  10. When processing is complete, let pressure drop completely.  Remove jars from your pressure canner and wipe with a hot soapy dish cloth.
  11. Label the contents and date.

Pressure Canner I use This canner is a little more expensive. The reason I bought it though is because its has metal on metal seal and never requires you to replace gaskets or seals. They last forever though.  Ive talked to women who have canners like this that were passed to them from their grandmothers, so for me the investment is worth it because I get my kids in on the action when we can around here. :)

Cheaper pressure canner

This recipe has made me a wonderful meal on many occasions, especially if I didn’t feel like cooking. ;)  I hope you enjoy it for many years to come.

Keepin It Spicy,

Jalapeño Gal

Please visit Jalapeño Gal’s survival surplus

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About the Author:

Cari is an editor and author for American Preppers Network. Her family currently live in Georgia. Cari spends her free time gardening, canning, testing products for review, helping others prepare and going to the gym. She believes preparedness is about love and taking care of your family. Cari also has her own website where she shares all of her preparedness articles and her recipes for canning, dehydrating, juicing, basic cooking. To have a look and hopefully follow her: Click Here! Please Join My New Blog!

25 Comments on "Canning Meatloaf Balls"

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  1. Whats going on with the website!?!? It won’t let me on…..

  2. Karen Kirk says:

    I thought you were not supposed to can anything with eggs in it. Could you please confirm this. Thanks!

  3. Karen Kirk says:

    I thought you were not supposed to can anything with eggs in it. Could you please confirm this. Thanks!

  4. not sure whats going on on the site but its being worked on.. As far as not cannin anything with eggs, i hadn’t heard about that. I would think the pressure cooking would cook it, but im not sure. I bake them in the oven first so it is cooked and not raw. I know many many people who can meatloaf with out any problems.

  5. not sure whats going on on the site but its being worked on.. As far as not cannin anything with eggs, i hadn’t heard about that. I would think the pressure cooking would cook it, but im not sure. I bake them in the oven first so it is cooked and not raw. I know many many people who can meatloaf with out any problems.

    • Canning eggs themselves is not recommended (water bathed OR pressure canned) and can be dangerous. Canning ‘things with eggs in them’ – it depends on what it is. In this case I would say its harmless as the eggs is mixed in with the meat balls and is not left in solid form. The heat from the pressure canner will have no problem penetrating the egg in this way and cooking it to the appropriate temperature. The only thing I would be cautious of would be the milk and bread crumbs – both of which are not recommended ingredients to can with. The theory behind the bread crumbs is that like rice they expand. The theory behind the milk is that milk and butter are low acid products that “support the outgrowth of C. botulinum and toxin formation in a sealed jar at room temperature. Fats in milk can protect botulism spores and toxins from heat if they are in a product during a canning process. So its all up to each person how much risk they want to take while preserving food.

      • And to clarify this even further the information regarding milk – is mostly in regards to canning milk solely and using milk in condensed soup recipes. Both of which are a NO NO in for canning for that reason. In my opinion using milk as a ‘binder’ like what was done in this recipe would be fairly. There is always going to be some percentage of a risk when you can anything, I do not believe using milk in this manner would increase that marginal risk anymore than usual. Hope I haven’t needlessly concerned anyone with my nerd-dom regurgitation of information. And I do apologize if I have. Long story short – I would can meat balls. But like JG said – not for a long period of time.  

  6. Pickled eggs, anybody?

  7. Thank you Prepper Jalepeno Gal!

  8. How long of a shelf life does canned meat have? TIA…

    • I am going to say 2-5 years, but I have heard of people keeping them much longer and when they were opened they were just fine. i ca not stress enough to rotate your food. If you are constantly rotating your food then you should not have to worry about it.

  9. Rhonda Hill says:

    I’m going to do this, but use my meat loaf recipe.
    Thanks!

  10. PonyRyd says:

    I wanted the same canner as you, but understand that it wont work with a glass cook top. Which is why I have the cheaper one you recommend. Please make sure the canner you purchase will work with the heating source available.

  11. I am going to say 2-5 years, but I have heard of people keeping them much longer and when they were opened they were just fine. i ca not stress enough to rotate your food. If you are constantly rotating your food then you should not have to worry about it.

  12. Jeepshots says:

    These were simply awesome!  I made a small batch for dinner tonight. Had twelve meatballs at the beginning of dinner – all are gone!  Kids loved them as well. We will be making these again. Thanks for sharing your recipes and knowledge with us. 

  13. Sherry-Dawn says:

    Can you tell me the pro’s and con’s of having a pressure canner and just doing it on your stove top in a large pot? I am new to this so forgive me if it is a dumb question. :-)

    • There is definitely no dumb questions when it comes to canning. Questions are super important. The method you are referring to when it comes to canning in a large pot on the stove top is called Water Bath canning and it is primarily used for high acid foods like fruit jams, jellies etc. A pressure cooker is used for low acidic foods like meats and vegetables. You *can not* safely jar up your meats and vegetables with out a pressure canner. There are a few things you can water bath if you add vinegar, but not many. Foods that are not high in acid have to reach a certain temperature and cook for a certain amount of time at that pressure to kill things like botulism or other bacterias that can kill you or make you very sick. this book is a must have for anyone learning to can. Ball Blue Book is the number one way to go when it comes to canning. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0778801314/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0778801314&linkCode=as2&tag=ameripreppnet-20

  14. Hoagy says:

    I don’t own a pressure cooker. Can I put the jars in the oven with the meatballs @350 for 1 hr and have them sterile? Could I cook it as meatloaf [instead of balls] right in the canning jars? I would boil sterilize the gaskets separately as the tops should be ok in the oven, too.

  15. It is typically not recommended to oven can anything by Food Safety experts for several reasons, including temperature accuracy and increased likelihood of contamination or spoilage. The process often involves a lot of guesswork or past experience. Reading up on the various methods and processes, as well as understanding the leading risks and expert recommendations, is essential before beginning.

    As well, a more immediate danger of oven canning is explosion. Canning jars are not designed to be exposed to prolonged dry heat and have been known to crack or even shatter during processing. At best, this creates a huge mess; at worst, it can lead to severe burns, cuts, and infections.

    This is a huge controversy among canners but i would NOT risk doing this. Canning meet has been tested using scientific methods and testing for a reason, and that is to make sure you do not make yourself sick or possibly kill yourself. It is important to familiarize your self with food canning safety measures by doing research verses trusting everything you read online. :) If you learn what is not safe and why then when you read a canning recipe on someones blog you can see the red flags as to why it might not be safe to do it.

    Here is a very good place to go for canning recipes and information: http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html

    About canning meatloaf:

    According to what I have read it is not wise to can meatloaf because of the binders in it. I believe because it makes it hard to sterilize because it is so dense. I see sooo many people out there canning meatloaf with the mind set of “It hasn’t killed anyone yet” so the risk is really what you decide on doing.

    I do meatloaf balls for several reasons: 1. Its cooked in the oven first. 2. The meat is formed into small balls verses a big wad of meat so it is not as dense with the bread crumbs therefore it can get hot enough in the center to kill the botulism spores.
    3. Its easier to get out of the jar :)

    If you really want to jar meatloaf I would recommend raw packing hamburger in one jar and your meatloaf glaze in another jar. Then just add your other ingredients (eggs, milk, bread crumbs) in when your ready to make the meatloaf.

    I hope this helps you understand why I do not can meatloaf.