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By November 8, 2012 Read More →

Storing Oats and Their Differences

mylar_bags_inside_pails

Many people store oats in their food storage, including myself.  When I first started prepping, I had no idea what the difference between steel-cut oats, rolled oats and quick oats were.  After doing a bit of research I now know.

  • Steel cut oats, also called Scotch or Irish oats,  are oats that have been cut.  They take the longest to cook and have a chewy consistency.
  • Rolled oats or Old Fashioned Oats are oats that have been steamed first and then rolled out flat.  They take longer to cook than quick oats, but not as long as steel-cut oats.
  • Quick oats, or instant oats, are what most of us are familiar with today.  These are pre-cut, dried and then rolled.  These cook in a few minutes and have a mushy consistency.
  • Oat Groats are whole, minimally processed oats.  They require hours of soaking and cooking before they are edible.  They are also referred to as “cleaned oats” in reference to the fact they have been hulled and then left alone.

Oats are one grain that has an exceptionally long shelf/storage life.  That is why so many preppers have oats stocked up.  I have some from last year, just sitting on the shelf in my pantry.  According to the LDS order form, if packaged in #10 cans they have a shelf life of 30 years.  Another option is to seal them in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers (OA) and put them in a five gallon bucket.  Store in a cool dry place.

Selecting the right size oxygen absorbers for your container.

I stress the importance of always using a Mylar bag and OA any time you use a bucket to store your food.  Unlike the #10 cans, the bucket is not an oxygen barrier.  There is a slow leak of oxygen through the plastic walls over a period of time.

The second reason we use the Mylar bags is insect or rodent protection.  If your food is properly sealed in a bag with an OA, then you can rest assured no bugs will get in your food.

Notes on Oats:

  • Oats are high in vitamin B1
  • Oats are low in fat and contain no cholesterol.
  • Oats are high in fiber.
  • Oats are a great source of protein.
  • Oats provide a slow release of energy in the morning because they are full of complex carbohydrates.
  • Raw oats help relieve constipation.
  • Oats relieve stress and are used to help treat depression, anxiety, and nervous disorders.
  • Oats help sooth skin disorders such as eczema and psoriasis.

My family and I love oatmeal so we always have it in our home.  You can also store brown/white sugar and dried fruits to add to your oats for more flavor.  There are lots of nutritional reasons why adding oats to your diet is a great idea.  They have a long shelf life, are cost affective and easy to store.  Please feel free to leave ideas in the comment sections.

Keepin It Spicy,

Jalapeño Gal

Please visit my store @ Jalapeño Gal’s Survival Surplus

More articles on preparedness

Recipes for your pleasure:

Oatmeal Raisin Scones

Baked Oatmeal With Almonds and Cherries

Ranger Oatmeal Cookies

Easy Homemade Granola

Banana Oat Muffins

 



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About the Author:

Cari is an editor and author for American Preppers Network. Her family currently live in Georgia. Cari spends her free time gardening, canning, testing products for review, helping others prepare and going to the gym. She believes preparedness is about love and taking care of your family. Cari also has her own website where she shares all of her preparedness articles and her recipes for canning, dehydrating, juicing, basic cooking. To have a look and hopefully follow her: Click Here! Please Join My New Blog!

29 Comments on "Storing Oats and Their Differences"

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  1. Clay says:

    Don’t forget about plain old oat groats (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-oat-groats.htm). They are just the whole grain of the oat. They take awhile to cook, but you can pressure cook them and it would be much quicker (that’s for any grain, which i am sure everyone knows).

  2. We got 6 five gallons of wheat for free the other day but its for our chickens, although I could grind it out in an emergency and can get tons more

  3. Oats packaged in #10 cans have a shelf life of 30 years! That’s good to know, never get tired of oatmeal!

  4. Jeff Watters says:

    One of the things that should get out to the people is the importance of pine nuts to stave off hunger. This is something very important to add to your food storage. Oats are a great food but pine nuts limit the consumption of greater quantities of food.

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  6. Can anyone tell me if storing the oats in a seal a meal bag will work like the Mylar bags?

  7. Can anyone tell me if storing the oats in a seal a meal bag will work like the Mylar bags?

  8. Debbie says:

    I appreciate you describing what different types of oats are available. Do some oats store better than others, and do some oats retain their nutritional content better than others? We have stored a lot of oats for our food storage. I think they are quick oats.

  9. @ endless, that works in mylar bags in 5 gallon buckets as well

  10. carrie, im unfamiliar with seal a meal bags

    • Martha P says:

      “Seal-a-meal” is the vacuum sealer bags like Food Saver. The bags are not as effective as the BoPET (mylar) bags for long-term storage, but are OK for short/mid storage. I have 2 kinds of storage: 6 mo-3yr. and 10+ yrs. for my supplies.

  11. VetMike says:

    I saw a comment that instant oats had a short shelf life even if stored in mylar and that one should only store steel cut or rolled oats. Do you have any insight on this? It seems from your article that this isn’t true.

  12. We had luck with storing corn in mylar bags in a recycled super pail bucket but we had horrible luck doing the same thing with flour (Ourselves not purchased that way) I will only buy #10 cans of flour currently putting bulk flour in recycled glass jars/canning jars with oxygen absorbers and going well so far! Next we upgrade our corn to organic to avoid GMOS

  13. We had luck with storing corn in mylar bags in a recycled super pail bucket but we had horrible luck doing the same thing with flour (Ourselves not purchased that way) I will only buy #10 cans of flour currently putting bulk flour in recycled glass jars/canning jars with oxygen absorbers and going well so far! Next we upgrade our corn to organic to avoid GMOS

  14. wat happened with the flour?

  15. Here is a new oven you can use to bake your bread in. It folds up to 1.5″ thick and 9″ by 13″ and only weighs 41 oz. You can use it on your stove top at home or with charcoal, campfire coals, alcohol stoves and backpacking stove of many types.

  16. The flour was horribly infested. Recently the corn meal we bought at walmart NEW and we froze it was full od dead bugs! We are out in no mans land so it would have been 2 hours drive to return it, we just chunked it

  17. In an emergency, you could sift the bugs out and use it! I would!

  18. Joe Nickel says:

    bugs are good source of protein but yes if you sift it its still good

  19. Susan Ambler says:

    I’m just getting started in the prepping world. I heard that hand-warmer packettes are a cheaper alternative to oxygen absorbers. Has anyone used them? Do you activate them before you seal the container or just take them out the package?

    • I personally would not do that, but I also haven’t heard of it either. Just thinking off the top of my head it doesn’t sound like a cheaper alternative either. Also, you have to have a certain cc amount per gallon and there is no way to tell that with hand warmers to my knowledge.

      JG



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